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Planning at Thursday 23rd November 2017 (Week 47).
 

BAe146 - FAAM

 

STANCO - School and Training on Aircraft New and well-established techniques for Atmospheric Composition Observation.

From Monday 26th June 2017 to Thursday 6th July 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: TA-015. Applications of atmospheric in-situ measurements.

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : DI CARLO Piero

Project confirmed Project confirmed
Transnational Access project Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 26th June 2017 (week 26) to Thursday 6th July 2017 (week 27)

Aircraft name Aircraft: BAe146 - FAAM

Season Season: 14 days during summer 2017.

Location Location:

The STANCO school will be held at the University of Cambridge, UK. Nearby suitable airport is the Cranfield airport, where the BAe-146 is based. In this way we will reduce the costs of transit for the aircraft, costs for accommodation and living of pilots, AVALON technicians and so on. Moreover, since at the University of Cambridge there are several researchers involved in aircraft observations, we can get some of them involved in the Training course to serve as Lecturers. Alternatively it will be held after a scientific campaign planned for summer 2017 in the airport where the campaign will based.

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract Training and education in airborne measurements of the atmospheric trace gases with special focus on new and emerging techniques, issues in the instruments calibration and links to modelling, dynamics and transport of atmospheric compounds.

Measurements to be made by aircraft The main objective is to provide, for students on a PhD level and postdoctoral early carrier scientists, an overview about measurement techniques, data analysis and specifics of the airborne measurements of species relevant in the atmospheric chemistry. Emphasis will be on new instruments and emerging observational techniques for aircraft observations. The lectures will include an introduction on atmospheric composition focusing on pollution transport, vertical distribution of atmospheric compounds and links between air pollution and climate changes. Air pollution and climate changes are global problems and the species responsible of these environmental issues are emitted essentially by the same processes: fossil fuel burning. Observations of these compounds on aircraft platforms is worthwhile because usually most of them have a high dependence with the altitude and a big horizontal variability. Moreover aircrafts allow in-situ measurements that help to identify and track emission plume of atmospheric trace gases. The lectures will cover the technical, engineering and safety aspects of the airborne measurements, not specific issue of one particular aircraft but the general aspects related to the most aircraft platforms used for atmospheric studies. Other lectures will focus on general aspects of the atmospheric composition, trace gases transport and chemistry. The STANCO course is planned to take place in Cambridge and Cranfield (UK) in summer 2017 for approximately 10 days and will be held at the University of Cambridge (UK). The lectures will be accompanied by a short visit of the FAAM BAe 146 research airplane (2 – 3 days). Students accepted for school will be asked, prior the STANCO School, to submit a small proposal of measurements that could be taken with the scientific payload available on board the aircraft. Depending on weather conditions, FAAM airplane will try to follow the students’ plans during ferry and mission flight. Data produced in the ferry and mission flight during the course of the STANCO will provide the basis for student’s final report from the course. The core teachers will be specialists in development of chemistry instruments and on their use on aircraft campaigns. Further lectures will be carried out by one FAAM aircraft systems manager, expert on instrument installations and certifications and by two lecturers specialist on atmospheric chemistry models. The possible preliminary list of invited teachers could be: Phil Brown (Met Office, UK), Jim McQuaid (University of Leeds, UK), Stephane Bauguitte (FAAM, UK), Carl Percival (University of Manchester, UK), Alan Woolley or Stephen Devereau or Mo Smith (FAAM, UK), Radovan Krejci (Stockholm University, Sweden), Rod Jones (University of Cambridge, UK), Alex Archibald (University of Cambridge, UK), Piero Di Carlo (L’Aquila University, Italy). The duration of the STANCO school is planned for not more than 10 days. This will include lectures (2 per days) for the first 5 days. The remaining time will include visit of the BAe-146 aircraft at the Cranfield airport and at the FAAM building, preparation of the flights and data analysis. The lectures will include following subjects: 1) Introduction to the atmospheric composition (chemistry and aerosol). 2) Atmospheric transport (large-scale transport, convection, turbulent entrainment). 3) Airborne measurements, pros and cons 4) New observational system for the atmospheric composition: already installed on aircraft and techniques not yet integrated on-board aircrafts. 5) O3, NOx, NOy, CO, CO2, CH4, HCN in-situ measurement techniques, which are the main species measured during research campaigns. Furthermore these species are measured using commercial instruments, so their data are immediately ready to be used for analysis during the school. 6) Custom instruments for in-situ measurements using techniques like CIMS, LIF, CARS, those systems provide real-time data that are available after each flight, so students can analyse them immediately. 7) Design and requirements for the scientific payload on board of the aircraft 8) Logistical, operational, flight planning aspects of the STANCO flights. 9) How airborne chemistry data can be used and what we can learn from them (scientific aspects). 10) Computer exercises, including data analysis and chemistry models exercises.

Weather constraints Weather conditions: Both, clear sky and cloudy conditions are fine to explore different aspect of atmospheric chemistry

Time constraints Time constraints: Availability of suitable air space. Availability of the BAe-146 aircraft with suitable instrumentation kit on board.

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): With respect to available number of hours for BAe-146 during 2017 within EUFAR-TA, three to four short flights of 4 hours are planned (depends on the students number).

Instruments Instruments: None

 

FA20 - DLR

 

ClIMa - Evaluation of ground-based lidar methodologies for continuous profiling of Cloud condensation and Ice nuclei concentrations in the Mediterranean

From Saturday 1st April 2017 to Sunday 30th April 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: TA-021. Applications of atmospheric in-situ measurement

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : AMIRIDIS Vassilis

Project confirmed Project confirmed
Transnational Access project Transnational Access project
Not open to training Not open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Saturday 1st April 2017 (week 13) to Sunday 30th April 2017 (week 17)

Aircraft name Aircraft: FA20 - DLR

Season Season: April – May 2017

Location Location:

Finokalia is a core station of the ACTRIS RI located on the north coast of Crete, Greece (35.338°N, 25.670°E). The station is located at the top of a hilly elevation (150m above sea level), facing the sea within a sector of 270° to 90°. No touristic or other human activities can be found at a distance shorter than 20 km within the aforementioned sector. In-situ measurements are performed in Finokalia continuously for the last 20 years. The station has been equipped recently with a sophisticated EARLINET lidar system (PollyXT), which is ideal for CCN and IN profiling from natural aerosols, mainly of dust and marine origin which are present 95% of the time on the site.

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract Large uncertainties in weather and future-climate predictions arise from the inability to comprehensively account for the interactions of aerosol with liquid-water, mixed-phase and cirrus clouds (Seinfeld et al., 2016). Aerosols directly modulate clouds by serving either as the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to form liquid droplets or as heterogeneous ice-nucleating particles (INP) via numerous ice nucleating pathways (e.g., deposition, immersion, contact freezing; e.g., Hoose and Mohler, 2012). Progress in aerosol-cloud interaction research requires global datasets of CCN and INP concentration which may be addressed with the unparalleled sampling of atmospheric volumes by remote sensing. The ill-posed nature of aerosol retrievals remains a limitation, which is gradually yielding to algorithmic developments. Extensive evaluation of retrievals against in-situ measurements is required before they can become operational. CLIMA aims to evaluate the suitability of lidar-derived aerosol number and surface area distribution for determining the concentrations of CCN and IN. Exploratory studies to date (Mamouri and Ansmann, 2016; Argyrouli et al., in review) have demonstrated the feasibility of retrievals with tolerable uncertainty. CLIMA will extensively evaluate the methodologies presented in these studies, comparing the lidar-derived CCN and particle size distribution profiles with airborne in-situ measurements. We propose to perform continuous ground-based lidar measurements in the ACTRIS core stations of Finokalia in Crete and Limassol in Cyprus, accompanied by sunphotometric and surface in-situ measurements. We request EUFAR TA to airborne in-situ profiling of CCN number concentration and particle size distributions and advanced microphysics which can be provided by the DLR Falcon-20 or the BAe146 FAAM aircraft.

Measurements to be made by aircraft Trustworthy predictions of the overall indirect aerosol effect on climate are impossible without accurate estimations of CCN and IN concentrations. The study of Mamouri and Ansmann (2016) showed the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of CCN and IN number concentrations. By means of the polarization lidar technique, the desert dust aerosol component can be easily separated from other continental aerosol components as well as from marine aerosol. After the separation of the basic aerosol types, the particle number and surface area concentrations are determined from the lidar-derived particle extinction coefficients, and are used as input in the CCN and IN parameterization schemes. There is room for validation and improvements of the method and this is what we plan to address during CLIMA campaign: we will provide extended comparisons of the lidar-derived CCN profiles with respective airborne in situ observations, as well as comparisons of the aerosol concentration derived with lidar and measured from airborne in-situ instruments, to assess the IN lidar retrievals. Moreover, we will tackle the open question how to handle the water-uptake effect by the particles in the retrieval of the required dry-particle microphysical properties. The selected site for the field experiment is the Finokalia atmospheric observatory, a core station of the “Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure- ACTRIS” European Research Infrastructure, located in the island of Crete in Greece. Being away from direct urban influence, the station is not affected by anthropogenic activities, especially during the dry season (from April to October) when intense Saharan dust events are frequently recorded (see http://charadmexp.gr/). The station is equipped with ground-based remote sensing instruments (i.e., the PollyXT-NOA multi-wavelength polarization lidar, the CIMEL sunphotometer) and surface in-situ instruments, providing ozone measurements, various aerosol particle parameters (PM10 mass, mass and number size distributions, scattering and absorption coefficients) and meteorological parameters (temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction). The CCN and IN profiles produced from the PollyXT-NOA lidar measurements in Finokalia will be validated against CCN and particle concentration measured with the in-situ instrumentation onboard the Falcon research aircraft during the ClIMA campaign. The PollyXT-NOA lidar water vapor channel and airborne in-situ RH measurements will be used to estimate the effect of humidity on the calculated CCN and IN profiles. A parallel experiment will be employed in Cyprus ACTRIS station, utilizing the LACROS facility of TROPOS. The CLIMA validation study will add to the efforts taken for the development of new products from remote sensing in the framework of the ACTRIS. The results will also be valuable for the simulation studies currently performed at ESA in anticipation of future lidar satellite missions (e.g. ADM-AEOLUS, EarthCARE, Sentinels). The results from the proposed experiment will be published in high-impact journals (e.g. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Atmospheric Measurements and Techniques). Reference: Mamouri, R.-E. and Ansmann, A.: Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 5905-5931, doi:10.5194/acp-16-5905-2016, 2016.

Weather constraints Weather conditions: Cloud-free conditions are required for aerosol remote sensing retrievals. Measurements during dust advection from Sahara Desert are of added value for the experiment, in order to test and validate dust discrimination methodologies.

Time constraints Time constraints: Periods of Saharan dust advection over Crete are targeted. April is the month of highest frequency for Saharan dust episodes in Eastern Mediterranean (e.g. Marinou et al., 2016), thus, the preferred time window of the campaign is 01/04/2016 – 30/04/2016. The proposed project is clustered with the DoGMA and SEAMAN EUFAR projects, which have been scheduled for the same time period. Additional synergies are created by clustering the proposed project with the ERC Starting Grant Project A-LIFE (Absorbing aerosol layers in a changing climate: aging, lifetime and dynamics) during which an airborne field experiment with the DLR research aircraft Falcon will be conducted in the Eastern Mediterranean. For A-LIFE, the DLR research aircraft Falcon will be based in Paphos/Cyprus. CLIMA is an aerosol campaign focused on CCN and IN retrievals utilizing lidars, thus having completely different objectives from DoGMA and SEAMAN which are concentrated on dust model validation and new particle formation respectively. Due to the episodic nature of dust advection the flights will be scheduled according to dust forecasts. The dataset that will be collected by the cluster of the campaigns over Crete will be used for cal/val activities as well. At NOA we target ESA missions like Sentinel 3, thus, overpass time constrains may have to be considered. ESA has expressed interest on participating on this cluster of campaigns.

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): In total, three flights are requested that correspond to 3 aircraft missions. The duration of each flight is approximately 04:00 hr. The flights pattern is illustrated in Figure 2. After take-off in Paphos, the Falcon aircraft will climb to 12 km altitude and fly westwards towards Crete thereby characterizing the dust layer with the airborne lidar instrument. Over Finokalia, the Falcon will descend with a stepped profile containing 4 steps at different altitudes between 0.3 km and the dust layer top, each of 7 minutes duration. Before landing at Paphos, a vertical profile with 4 steps at different altitudes in the dust layer will be flown over the ground-based lidar at Limassol, Cyprus.

Instruments Instruments: None

Other constraints Other constraints or requirements: None

 

DoGMA - Evaluating Dust forecasting over the eastern Mediterranean Area

From Saturday 1st April 2017 to Wednesday 12th April 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: TA-021. Applications of atmospheric in-situ measurement

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : NICKOVIC Slobodan

Project confirmed Project confirmed
Transnational Access project Transnational Access project
Not open to training Not open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Saturday 1st April 2017 (week 13) to Wednesday 12th April 2017 (week 15)

Aircraft name Aircraft: FA20 - DLR

Season Season: April 2017

Location Location:

The area of Crete is a natural laboratory for dust research. It is located at a crossroad of aerosol transport paths from Africa and European sources and the abrupt topography of the island favors the development of convective clouds that are more susceptible to IN variations. Moreover, the station of Finokalia is a fully equipped ACTRIS station heavily assisting the dust research activities in the area.

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract Dust is the most abundant aerosol at the greater Mediterranean region. Apart from the air quality implications, dust is also a significant climate and weather modulator. Dust aerosols are very efficient ice nuclei (IN), and they play an important role in heterogeneous cloud glaciation. Introducing a dust based ice nucleation parameterization in NMM-DREAM model allows the calculation of dust IN activation and the related impacts in cloud properties. However, in order to properly assess the modification of cloud properties due to dust contamination one should first evaluate the model performance with regards to the basic parameters that participate in these processes. The model IN parameterization takes into account two different mechanisms: 1. Immersion ice nucleation (DeMott et al., 2015) that is dominant for high cloud temperatures (-5 ; -36 C) and 2. Deposition ice nucleation (Steinke et al., 2015) that takes place at lower cloud temperatures (-36; -55 C). Both modeling schemes rely on atmospheric parameters (temperature and relative humidity) and on dust concentration. More specifically, immersion nucleation requires the number concentration of dust particles with a diameter larger than 0.5 μm. Evaluation of these model processes over the Mediterranean is very important for the quantification of dust impact in cloud formation and evolution. A correct representation of these processes in the model will allow the accurate description of aerosol radiative forcing due to the dust cloud interactions (indirect aerosol effect). Furthermore, weather forecast and precipitation estimations will benefit from the more realistic representation of dust interactions in cold clouds.

Measurements to be made by aircraft Dust is always present in the Mediterranean and especially during transition seasons (e.g. April-May) huge dust amounts are transported from the Saharan sources towards SE Europe with significant implications for weather and climate. Crete is the ideal natural laboratory to investigate the aerosol – cloud interactions by taking advantage of the in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation in Finokalia ACTRIS core station in cooperation with aircraft measurements and modeling simulations. The main objectives of this research are the following: 1. Measure temperature and humidity profiles inside the elevated dust layers 2. Examine the concentration of airborne dust particles and their size distribution (fine to coarse ratio) over the greater E Mediterranean region. 3. Assess the accuracy of dust concentration forecasting in NMM-DREAM and investigate the ice glaciation capabilities of the model. The methodology proposed to carry out the experiment is mainly based on observations of Saharan mineral dust plumes. During spring, these plumes are usually accompanied by cloud formations often leading to stormy weather and severe precipitations including wet deposition of dust. These clouds are affected by dust and their properties are altered depending on dust concentration and sizes. Aircraft measurements of the meteorological and aerosol parameters inside the dust layers will be used to evaluate the performance of NMM-DREAM forecast fields. Model interpretation and assessment of the simulations will be performed together with space-borne and aircraft lidar profiles, ground photometers and ground chemical/size characterization of dust. The anticipated outputs from this work include the improvement of our knowledge on dust processes and the validation of dust modeling results that will increase our confident on these products over this particular area. Scientific results from the analysis and interpretation of campaign measurements will be published in peer-review journals at the fields of remote sensing, atmospheric physics and numerical modeling (e.g. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Journal of Geophysical Research, Atmospheric Environment, Atmospheric Measurements and Techniques etc.) References DeMott, P. J., Prenni, A. J., McMeeking, G. R., Sullivan, R. C., Petters, M. D., Tobo, Y., Niemand, M., Möhler, O., Snider, J. R., Wang, Z., and Kreidenweis, S. M.: Integrating laboratory and field data to quantify the immersion freezing ice nucleation activity of mineral dust particles, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 393–409, doi:10.5194/acp-15-393-2015, 2015. Steinke, I., Hoose, C., Möhler, O., Connolly, P., and Leisner, T.: A new temperature- and humidity-dependent surface site density approach for deposition ice nucleation, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 3703–3717, doi:10.5194/acp-15-3703-2015, 2015.

Weather constraints Weather conditions: Transport of Saharan dust towards Crete is the most important requirement for the evaluation of the relevant parameters in the model.

Time constraints Time constraints: Periods of Saharan dust advection over Crete are targeted. April is the month of highest frequency for Saharan dust episodes in Eastern Mediterranean, thus, the preferred time window of the campaign is 01/04/2016 – 30/04/2016. The proposed project is clustered with the ClIMa and SEAMAN EUFAR projects, which have been scheduled for the same time period. Due to the episodic nature of dust advection the flights should be scheduled according to dust forecasts. Optimal flight legs should be collocated with CATS and/or A-Train overpasses (CALIPSO, CLOUDSAT) and flight heights should allow the measurement of dust properties at areas permitting cold cloud formation. Model dust forecasts will be routinely used during the campaign to assist the scheduling of aircraft operations.

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): In order to obtain the maximum information for the characterization of dust layers the aircraft should fly during episodes of dust advection of various properties (e.g. no cloud conditions, dust contaminated cyclone, and dust affected orographic clouds). In total, two flights are requested that correspond to 2 aircraft missions. The duration of each flight is approximately 04:00 hr. The flights pattern is illustrated in Figure 2. After take-off in Paphos, the Falcon aircraft will climb to 12 km altitude and fly westwards towards Crete thereby characterizing the dust layer with the airborne lidar instrument. Over Finokalia, the Falcon will descend with a stepped profile containing 4 steps at different altitudes between 0.3 km and the dust layer top, each of 7 minutes duration. Before landing at Paphos, a vertical profile with 4 steps at different altitudes in the dust layer will be flown over the ground-based lidar at Limassol, Cyprus.

Instruments Instruments: None

 

FA20 - SAFIRE

 

Rasta ESA - Rasta ESA

From Monday 2nd January 2017 to Tuesday 31st January 2017

Description

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : None

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Not open to training Not open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 2nd January 2017 (week 01) to Tuesday 31st January 2017 (week 05)

Aircraft name Aircraft: FA20 - SAFIRE

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Instruments Instruments: None

 

AEROCLO-SA - AEROCLO-SA

From Tuesday 1st August 2017 to Saturday 30th September 2017

Description

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : Paola Formenti

Project confirmed Project confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Not open to training Not open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Tuesday 1st August 2017 (week 31) to Saturday 30th September 2017 (week 39)

Aircraft name Aircraft: FA20 - SAFIRE

Location Location: Map Walvis Bay Namibia

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Instruments Instruments: None

 

Learjet - Enviscope

 

ATR42 - SAFIRE

 

EASI - Exploring Air Sea Interaction via airborne data – a training course

From Sunday 25th June 2017 to Tuesday 4th July 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: TA-017. Proposals for training courses in hyperspectral imaging applications or in-situ sampling

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : LANOTTE Alessandra Sabina

Project confirmed Project confirmed
Transnational Access project Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Sunday 25th June 2017 (week 25) to Tuesday 4th July 2017 (week 27)

Aircraft name Aircraft: ATR42 - SAFIRE

Season Season: From June 25, to July 4, 2017 . The prelimanary programme is available here: http://eufar.net/documents/6143

Location Location:

The location of the Training Course is Shannon, with the aircraft based at Shannon Airport. A position close to the airport will be chosen to maximize the training course outcome and contain transporting expenses. Location of the school provides, beyond lodging, classroom and teaching facilities too. A collaboration with the airport authorities that might provide useful ancillary services, as real time weather radar images would be profitable: efforts will be promoted in this direction. Shannon airport has been selected for the three following reasons: 1) the airport is close to the coast, and hence its position is ideal for the specific scientific purpose of the school, wich is to collect measurements on air-sea interaction and near-coastal boundary layer structure and dynamics; 2) Shannon airport is not new to this kind of experience, a noticeable example is the NASA project studying the chemistry of aircraft emissions in the trans-Atlantic flight corridor (SONEX: https://cloud1.arc.nasa.gov/sonex/); 3) Shannon is the closest available airport to Mace Head station, with which we established an agreement for a synergic use of data during the timeframe of the EUFAR school. The agreement relies also on the existence of a joint lab established in 2015 between the italian CNR-ISAC (the institution of the present proposal PI) and the Center for Climate & Air Pollution Studies, National University of Ireland. We already contacted Shannon Airport authorities and received their positive feedback about the proposal. Moreover, to find the best solution for the venue, we contacted Karen Brosnahan, who is the General Manager of the Shannon Region Conference and Sports Bureau.

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract The primary goal of the EASI proposed course is to teach and train students (PhD and Post-graduate) and young scientists on the use of a research aircraft, and on the experimental possibilities it opens for atmospheric physics and chemistry research. This implies providing them with a complete overview of the airborne and remote sensing experimental techniques, and on specific features of collection and analysis of airborne measurements. In addition, EASI aims at trasferring to participants consolidated knowledge, and recent advancements in relation to the specific topics of air-sea interaction, and near coastal boundary layer structure and dynamics. It is planned to host about 20 students that will be selected on the basis of their CV, and of a short scientific proposal about possible measurements and related research questions. The EUFAR Training school, once approved, will be advertised through its standard means, and an call will be opened to select participants. There are no specific prerequisites for the course, but having a background in atmospheric and ocean sciences, geophysics, and/or meteorology will be positively considered. Trainees have to design a flight plan and participate to a flight experiment. The data gathered are then processed and analysed with the support of tutors, who are experienced users of airborne facilities. EASI training course is planned to take place either from June 25, to July 4, 2017 close to Shannon Airport , Ireland (53°N,9°W). To fully exploit the possibilities opened by a instrumented aircraft at disposal, we established an agreement with Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station (http://www.macehead.org/), to organise a synergic use of the data collected both from the aircraft and from the ground station, during the school time frame. Specifically, flight experiments and lectures of EASI will deal with the problem of air-sea interaction, focusing on turbulence fluctuations in the near coastal boundary layer, clouds micro-physics, atmospheric composition and its impacts on climate, momentum and heat exchanges at the air/sea interface. Lectures will be alternated with working groups on instrument calibration, safety issues and data analysis. The PI of this proposal has led the EUFAR training course TETRAD in 2010. A preliminary list of invited lecturers is the following (not yet complete): Francesco Cairo, CNR ISAC Rome (Italy) - confirmed & member of EUFAR Maria Cristina Facchini, CNR ISAC Bologna (Italy) - confirmed Ian C. Faloona, University of California (USA) - confirmed & member of EUFAR Szymon Malinowski, Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland) - confirmed & member of EUFAR Mario Miglietta, CNR ISAC Padova (Italy) - confirmed Olivier Henry, Météo-France/CNRM - confirmed & member of EUFAR

Measurements to be made by aircraft The scientific objectives of this proposal can be summarised as follows: 1. The primary goal of the EASI course is to train participant on how to use an aircraft as a research tool and how to manage an experiment with airborne measurements. 2. The secondary goal of the school lectures and of the related experiments is to train and educate students about the air-sea interaction process and their influence on the near coastal boundary layer structure and dynamics. The training school experiments are conceived for education purpose and not for research. Hence, they do not aim at dealing with all physical and chemical factors relevant for this complex environment. Rather, they will focus on specific topics, such as the effects of coastal process on momentum and heat exchanges, and mixing; the near-coastal boundary layer structure and dynamics; marine aerosols and clouds formation at near coastal sites. Many of these topics can be discussed in relation to the available instrumentation of the SAFIRE ATR42 aircraft. From the available climatology for the region of Shannon, we expect to have mild weather condition , with mean daily temperatures in the range [10:20] °C, partly cloudy or cloudy sky, and relative humidity about 80%. These conditions are perfectly suitable for the purpose of the training school, dealing with measurements within the near-coastal boundary layer, and measurements at the base or inside marine clouds. As mentioned, the chosen application field is Air-Sea interaction and near-coastal boundary layer, for which in-situ observations represent a unique possibility to access to a wide range of highly resolved data. EASI school lectures, given by experts of airborne measurements and atmospheric physics and chemistry, will cover the following topics divided into three main themes: 1) Fundamentals on Airborne measurements - Introduction to the set of instruments on the aircraft - Aircraft operation limitations, flight plans and safety issues - Basic measurement techniques - Measurement issues unique to aircraft platform interaction with the environment - Data processing and interpretation issues 2) Near-coastal boundary layer (BL) and air-sea interaction - momentum & heat exchanges - mixing - mean and fluctuating components - BL structure & dynamics, and the role of the ocean 3) Atmospheric composition and the impact on climate - Marine aerosol micro-physics - Marine aerosol and cloud droplets concentration and size distribution - Impact on climate Summarising, the specific objectives of this proposal will be achieved by organising an intense and well structured training by means of: • Lectures on specific topics by experienced researchers • Lectures on airborne measurements and their limitations by expert of the fields • Training on the security issue for airborne measurements by SAFIRE staff • Individual/Group work to build up the flight plans and identify the scientific questions of the airborne experiment • Practical group work to discuss and analyse data: resolution issues, data interpretation. We will foster active learning by inviting student to handle specific scientific questions, and discuss them within the training group. It is expected that, at the end of the school, students have received: i) a first training of research aircraft, and airborne-based experimental techniques and research possibilities; ii) an overview of the scientific problems - related to air-sea interaction and near-coastal boundary layer structures and dynamics-, that can be tackled via in-situ measurements.

Weather constraints Weather conditions: Clear and partly cloudy weather. Cloudy boundary layer.

Time constraints Time constraints: The Training school is expected to last 10 to 12 days. Even if the baseline award for any Transnational Access proposal is 10 hours, we ask EUFAR to award 12-14 hours flight to this project. The reason of this request is the estimated transit flight time Toulouse-Shannon-Toulouse, of about 6:30h. SAFIRE agrees not to charge EUFAR for one transit flight. Having 12-14 hours granted would allow us to make four training flights of at least 1.5h each, and not having extremely rigid constraints on flight duration. Beyond this request, we do not have other time constraints, exception made for the airport authorization.

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): It is planned to make four flights, hosting five students each. Flight duration - which might vary depending on weather conditions-, is about 1,5 hours each. At the present stage, it is planned to negotiate flight paths for three days of flying, to be established. These can be useful to best exploit local weather conditions. Detailed flight paths will be designed during the training course, however some working airspace will be negotiated in advance, with airport authorities. Definition of the flight patterns will be done in the initial stages of the school, and will be an essential part of the training activities of the course. Generally, flight patterns are designed to best characterizing the physical properties of interest. In the present case, since we are interested in near-coastal boundary layer and air-sea interaction, we will fly in proximity of Mace Head facility. Aerosol-cloud interaction in the north Atlantic Marine Boundary Layer could also be studied, if we can exploit ground aerosol measurements at Mace Head, combined to aircraft measurements obtained from quasi-lagrangian flight legs.

Instruments Instruments: Airborne Aerosol Reference Pod - Microphysics

 

POLAR 5 - AWI

 

ANT 2016/17 - Airborne geophysical surveys and remote sensing

From Monday 7th November 2016 to Saturday 25th February 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: Several projects for mapping ice thickness, magnetic and gravity field, altimetry, and photography

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : None

Project confirmed Project confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 7th November 2016 (week 45) to Saturday 25th February 2017 (week 08)

Aircraft name Aircraft: POLAR 5 - AWI

Location Location:

Novo runway, Neumayer station, Kohnen Station, field camps, all Antarctica

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Measurements to be made by aircraft - ice penetrating radar - magnetics - gravity - laser scanning - photography

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): 20-30 flights, max. 160 h

Instruments Instruments: None

 
 

PAMARCMIP 2017 - PAMARCMIP

From Monday 13th March 2017 to Tuesday 18th April 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: Polar Airborne Measurements and Regional Climate Model Simulation Project) as contribution of NETwork on Climate and Aerosols: Addressing Key Uncertainties in Remote Canadian Environments

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : None

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 13th March 2017 (week 11) to Tuesday 18th April 2017 (week 16)

Aircraft name Aircraft: POLAR 5 - AWI

Location Location: Map various Canada, Greenland, Svalbard

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract The operation with the AWI POLAR aircraft represents one key component of the atmospheric and sea ice study in the Arctic within the PAMARCMIP program (Polar Airborne Measurements and Regional Climate Model Simulation Project). Within PAMARCMIP large-scale measurement of sea ice thickness in key Arctic areas will be performed in the framework of an international cooperation between German, Canadian and US institutes. The plan for spring 2017 is similar to the successful PAMARCMiP campaigns since 2009. Sea ice thickness is the key property for predicting the summer minimum sea ice extent. Sea ice thinning and retreat are expected to continue as a result of climate change with a major uncertainty introduced by decadal and long-term natural climate variability. Accurate ice thickness information is still sparse over the Arctic Ocean. Additionally snow thickness measurements are planned with a radar system. Further, atmospheric components will be measured simultaneously to the Sea ice and snow thickness measurements, amongst which are aerosols, black carbon and different trace gases. These measurements have been performed since 2009 with the aim to fill the knowledge gaps in the spatial and temporal distribution and variability. The research focus for the aircraft activity is the area from Svalbard to Alaska. As described below, the flight campaigns will contribute to our understanding of the role, the sources, and the transport pathways of atmospheric aerosol - especially black carbon - in the Arctic. The study will include the identification of local sources of observed aerosol layers.

Science context Polar regions, troposphere Aerosol chemistry and physics, Geophysics and Glaciology, Pollution (includes air, sea and soil)

Measurements to be made by aircraft - sea-ice thickness - altimetry - basic meteorological parameters - aerosol distribution

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): 20-25 flights, max. 130 h

Instruments Instruments: None

 

ACLOUD 2017 - Arctic Amplification: Fluxes in the Cloudy Atmospheric Boundary Layer

From Wednesday 17th May 2017 to Saturday 8th July 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: Measurements of turbulent and radiative energy fluxes above, in and below Arctic boundary layer clouds for differentmeteorological, sea ice and aerosol conditions

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : None

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Wednesday 17th May 2017 (week 20) to Saturday 8th July 2017 (week 27)

Aircraft name Aircraft: POLAR 5 - AWI

Location Location: Map Longyearbyen, Svalbard

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract The main objectives of this project are (i) to measure energy fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over polar sea ice in cloudy and clear-sky conditions, (ii) to investigate their dependence on aerosol particle properties and vertical distribution, and (iii) to compare the energy fluxes with respective model results. The analysis of the data of this project will help to understand the role of low- level Arctic clouds in the energy budget of the ABL. The program is closely linked with the planned DFG SFB/Transregio project on Arctic amplification (acronym (AC)3, Arctic Amplification: Climate Relevant Atmospheric and Surface Processes, and Feedback, pre-proposal submitted to DFG in June 2014). The instrumented Polar 5 and Polar 6 aircraft will be used to perform the measurements of turbulent and radiation fluxes as a function of cloud cover, sea ice characteristics, synoptic forcing, and geographic position with a focus on the vertical distribution of the fluxes. Both aircraft will be equipped with remote sensing (Polar 5) and in-situ (mainly on Polar 6) instrumentation. Measurements based on the combination of turbulence and radiation, as well as microphysical probes, Lidar, Radar and microwave sensors for aerosol and cloud properties will improve our understanding of the interaction between cloud characteristics and turbulence and of their role for the ABL energy budget. The campaign will be closely coordinated with a proposed cruise of RV Polarstern (PASCAL, Physical feedbacks of Arctic PBL, Sea ice, Cloud And Aerosol) that will be used as a platform for surface based observations using a large suite of meteorological instrumentation (installed partly on the ship and on sea ice) to determine e.g., the surface energy budget. Due to the close link to (AC)3 and PASCAL several groups from different German research institutes (Universities of Bremen, Köln, and Leipzig, TROPOS Leipzig, AWI Bremerhaven and AWI Potsdam) will benefit from the measurement program although not all of them will directly participate in the measurements.

Science context Atmospheric boundary layer, polar regions Cloud physics, Ocean-Atmosphere interactions, Radiation

Measurements to be made by aircraft  Airborne observations of meteorological and sea ice parameters supplementing shipborne observations of the atmospheric profile and surface energy budget by RV Polarstern during the research cruise PASCAL;  Measurements characterizing the mean state of the atmospheric boundary layer during late spring/early summer (temperature, humidity, wind components);  Turbulent fluxes (vertical profiles based on horizontal, vertically staggered flight sections);  Aerosol number and mass size distributions;  Cloud particle shape, concentration, size distribution, scattering phase function;  Aerosol and meteorological profiles up to 3 km altitude;  Spectral upward and downward radiances and broadband irradiances;  Polarized upward radiance and imagery;  Retrieval of cloud optical thickness and effective radius maps based on hyperspectral imaging;

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): 15-25 flights, max. 160 h

Instruments Instruments: None

 

TIFAX 2017 - Thick Ice Feeding Arctic Export

From Saturday 15th July 2017 to Tuesday 15th August 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: Sea ice thickness determination across Fram Strait and north of Greenland.

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : None

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Saturday 15th July 2017 (week 28) to Tuesday 15th August 2017 (week 33)

Aircraft name Aircraft: POLAR 5 - AWI

Location Location: Map Station Nord, Greenland

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract Fram Strait is the main gateway for sea ice export out of the Arctic Ocean, and therefore observations there give insight into composition and properties of Arctic sea ice in general and how it varies over time. An extensive data set of ground-based and airborne electromagnetic ice thickness measurements were collected between 2001 and 2015 during severall aircraft (PAMARCMIP, TIFAX) and Polarstern campaigns. The first aim of the proposed aircraft campaign is to complement earlier sea ice thickness measurements made north of Svalbard and over Fram Strait. A second objective is to extent previous measurements to the Lincoln Sea. Data will be used to together with satellite based information on sea ice motion, to number sea ice outflow through Fram Strait in summer and investigate thinning of sea ice due to reduction of old multi-year ice. In addition to sea ice surveys, atmospheric components will be measured.

Science context Marine science, Ocean-Atmosphere interaction

Measurements to be made by aircraft - sea ice thickness - altimetry - optical imagery

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): 4-10 flights, max 60 h

Instruments Instruments: None

 
 

ANT 2017/18 - Airborne geophysical surveys and remote sensing as well as logistic support of field teams and stations

From Monday 6th November 2017 to Saturday 24th February 2018

Description

Project theme Project theme: Several projects for mapping ice thickness, magnetic and gravity field, altimetry, and photography

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : None

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 6th November 2017 (week 45) to Saturday 24th February 2018 (week 08)

Aircraft name Aircraft: POLAR 5 - AWI

Location Location:

Novo runway, Neumayer station, Kohnen Station, field camps, all Antarctica

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Science context Polar Regions, geophysics and glaciology

Measurements to be made by aircraft - ice penetrating radar - magnetics - gravity - laser scanning - photography

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): 20-30 flights, max 160 h

Instruments Instruments: None

 

C 208 - DLR

 

CASA 212 AR - INTA

 

CASA 212 RS - INTA

 

MASOMED - MApping SOil variability within rainfed MEDiterranean agroecosystems using hyperspectral data

From Wednesday 3rd May 2017 to Friday 19th May 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: TA-020. Airborne imaging for environmental science applications.

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : CHABRILLAT Sabine

Project confirmed Project confirmed
Transnational Access project Transnational Access project
Not open to training Not open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Wednesday 3rd May 2017 (week 18) to Friday 19th May 2017 (week 20)

Aircraft name Aircraft: CASA 212 RS - INTA

Season Season: Preferred date would be April 2017, extendable depending on winter weather conditions until early May 2017. Agreement to shate aircraft time: Yes

Location Location:

The study area is located in the centre of Spain, in the north-west sector of the Autonomous Community of Castilla-La Mancha, Province of Toledo, approximately 50 km SW from Madrid (please refer to the attached document “MASOMEDstudysite.pdf” for a map and coordinates of the proposed study site). This area joins characteristics of special interest in terms of this proposal, such as Mediterranean climate, extended agricultural rainfed uses, mostly evolved soils, and erosion features associated to contrasting soil horizons. Furthermore and most important for the aim of this proposal related to detect changes in the area, data exist from the 2011 dry season in this study area linked with the 1st Camarana EUFAR TA proposal (SEDMEDHY) and related works where erosion stages were determined in fields that were free of vegetation in summer 2011 (Schmid et al., 2016). The study area is situated in the Tagus Basin (South Iberian Meseta), and corresponds to the Guadarrama river catchment. The climate is Mediterranean, with a continental variant that shows cool winter temperatures, and low precipitations with maximum in late autumn, winter and late spring and an outstanding minimum in summer. The meteorological station of Las Ventas de Retamosa (station 3282 of the National Network of the Spanish Ministry of Environment), situated in the northern limit of the area, provides temperature and precipitation data. The average monthly temperature is in the range of 6.1 to 24.7ºC with an average annual temperature of 14.6ºC and an average monthly rainfall of 7 to 56 mm with an average yearly rainfall of 429 mm, respectively. The substrate is formed by Miocene arkoses (feldpars, quartz, phyllosilicates as main constituents), and Quaternary associated sediments constituting forms as glacis, terraces and alluvial fans. Such materials and forms are associated to a gently undulating relief, at altitudes between 500 and 640 m a.s.l. Dominant soils are highly developed: Alfisols (Calcic Haploxeralfs, according to the Soil Taxonomy (Soil Survey Staff, 2010)), or Luvisols, (Calcic Luvisols according to the IUSS Working Group WRB, 2006). The typical profile is characterized by an A horizon, a Bt horizon and a Ck horizon that overlies the arkosic material. Erosion intensity and plowing practices determine the presence of different soil horizons in surface, with contrasting soil properties. An over flight in the spring period (preferably at the end of April or beginning of May) would be considered an ideal option due to the following reasons: 1) cereal crop cultivation will have a maximum active photosynthetic activity; 2) further cultivations such as grapevines and olive groves with active photosynthesis and soil exposed around the individual plants will be present; and 3) abandoned areas will be either in fallow or have an annual vegetation with a green coverage that should be clearly visible.

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract Cultivation and land use practices have a long history within the Mediterranean region exploiting soils as a natural resource. The soils are an essential factor contributing to agricultural production of rainfed crops such as cereals, olive groves and vineyards. Inadequate management is endangering their quality and productivity. The main objective of this proposal is to map soil variability and quality related to crop stress and land management within a Mediterranean environment based on hyperspectral data within the visible, near-infrared, short-wave infrared as well as thermal infrared including medium and long wave infrared range. The following scientific issues are considered: 1) determining soil variability throughout the study area using high resolution hyperspectral data; 2) assessing the spatial distribution of rainfed agroecosystems according to abiotic and biotic properties; 3) relating vegetation stress to soil degradation processes and conditions; 4) classify soil and crop cover related to soil erosion processes; 5) addressing the potential of future space-borne hyperspectral sensors; and 6) integrating existing space-borne sensors to enhance soil and vegetation cover information using time series. Airborne acquisition will be accompanied by a field campaign including field spectroscopy soil sampling and analyses and characterising vegetation parameters. The aim will be to acquire data from space-borne sensors at the time of the hyperspectral acquisition as well as obtaining data sets from other selected dates during the period of the crop cultivations. An integrated methodology will be implemented to incorporate the multi-source data obtained and compile a database based on GIS technologies.

Measurements to be made by aircraft Soils within Mediterranean areas form part of a fragile ecosystem, and are greatly influenced by extensive human activities for food production that imply an agricultural land use affecting soil conditions and causing soil degradation (García-Ruiz, 2010). The traditional agricultural activities in southern Europe include the cultivation of rainfed crops, vineyards and olive groves. In this case, the potential impact of agricultural practices is highly dependent on management strategies such as bare soil exposure and tillage practices. Factors such as climate, crop rotation, agricultural practices and policy regulations have a profound impact on the management of cultivated lands (Previtali, 2014). In the past, the European Common Agricultural Policy has introduced changes such as a set-aside program requiring farmers to take certain percentages of their arable land out of production (Boellstorff and Benito, 2005). It has been observed that in recent years, arable land is being cultivated on a yearly basis and that there is a diminishing tendency to leave land in fallow. This means that there is a change occurring in the land management. This proposal is part of an overall research aiming at developing an integrated methodology using hyperspectral optical, thermal and lidar data combined with SAR single and full polarimetric data to map soil resources and land management activities. As a follow-on to the SEDMEDHY-TA proposal that successfully acquired hyperspectral and lidar data in the dry season (summer 2011) and allowed to develop a methodology to map erosion stages (Schmid et al, 2016), the present study aims at mapping the soil variability during the growing season and associated vegetation stress indicators within the rainfed Mediterranean agroecosystems based on hyperspectral optical and thermal data. For this, the following scientific issues are pursued: 1) determining soil variability throughout the study area using the full potential of visible, near infrared, and thermal infrared hyperspectral CASI 1500i and AHS data; 2) assessing the spatial distribution of the different rainfed agroecosystems according to abiotic and biotic properties; 3) relating vegetation stress to soil degradation processes and conditions; 4) detect changes related to soil erosion of soil surface covers by comparing current conditions with those identified in previous work (Schmid et al., 2016), and developing a decision tree methodology to classify the soil and crop cover related to soil erosion processes at the pixel level; 5) assessing the variability of soil properties at different spatial scales with the aim of testing the transferability of the methods used to future hyperspectral space-borne sensors such as EnMAP, HISUI, PRISMA, SHALOM; and 6) integrating existing space-borne optical, thermal infrared and radar sensors such as Landsat 8, ASTER, Copernicus Sentinel 1 and 2 and linking to Radarsat2 data to enhance soil and vegetation cover information using time series. The latter issue aims to study the potential of combining multi-source data (optical, radar, thermal) to asses and spatially map soil quality and crop stress, and to test and develop a simplified methodology that can determine soil and vegetation cover properties associated to soil degradation processes based on current satellite sensors. Data obtained from space-borne sensors will be acquired at the time of the hyperspectral acquisition as well as obtaining data sets from other selected dates during the period of the crop cultivations. Field work will include obtaining spectral data with field spectroradiometers and a thermal radiometer (multispectral CIMEL 312-2) as well as field measurements of soil and vegetation parameters and agricultural activities. An integrated methodology will be further implemented to incorporate the data obtained with the different sensors at the different spatial and spectral resolutions and compiling a database based on GIS technologies. Hyperspectral data obtained with the CASI 1500i and AHS sensors will be used to determine land cover and soil and vegetation characteristics associated to soil degradation processes. The spatial distribution and fraction cover of soil and vegetation surfaces will be assessed and related to the agricultural management practises. For this, spectral unmixing and hard classifier methods will be used. Then visible-near infrared (VNIR: 0.4-1.0 µm) soil and vegetation spectroscopy data will be used to map soil properties (iron content, organic carbon), crop productivity through different vegetation indices (NDVI, red-edge derived indices), water crop stress (water band ~0.94 µm), crop conditions (stressed/healthy through location and slope of the red-edge). Short-wave infrared (SWIR: 1-2.45 µm) spectroscopy data will allow to determine the fraction of vegetation or plant residues, additional soil properties (clay, organic matter, carbonate content). The thermal infrared (TIR: 3-5, 8-12 µm) data will allow to further determine water crop stress, dry vegetation residues, additional soil properties (sand content, better clay and carbon determination). The main output of our proposed activity will be a set of thematic maps of soil and crop variability and related parameters such as land cover, land use and soil properties. The methodology developed and results will be published in international peer-reviewed journals such as Catena, Agriculture Ecosystems and Environment and Remote Sensing of the Environment.

Weather constraints Weather conditions: The proposed activities require clear sky conditions. Some (cumulus) clouds (less than 10%) can be accepted if not positioned on the target area as shadows.

Time constraints Time constraints: Time of acquisition would be ideal within +/- 2 hours local solar noon in order to reduce shadow effects. The acquisition window would be preferably in the last week of April 2017 to the first week of May 2017, before the end of the growing season for cereal crops.

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): In order to cover the study site of 5 km by 19 km, four parallel flight lines with a N-S direction at 2625 m above ground with the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager CASI 1500i and three parallel flight lines at 1825 m above ground with the Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner AHS would be needed to obtain 1 m (CASI) and 3 m (AHS) spatial resolution images. It would be important that the flight lines are taken always in the North to South direction meaning that the flight direction is against the sun. The total flight time is estimated to be about 5 hours.

Instruments Instruments: INTA Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner

Other constraints Other constraints or requirements: None

 

DO228 - NERC - ARSF

 

DO228/D-CFFU - DLR

 

DO228/D-CODE - DLR

 

STEMME S15 - INTA

 

Twin Otter - NERC - BAS

 

C 207 - FUB

 

ECO Dimona - UEDIN

 

ENDURO - KIT

 

ERAs - CNR ISAFom

 

PIPER AZTEC - SAFIRE

 

Partenavia - Enviscope

 

TASI Partenavia IMAA

 

ASK16 - FUB

 

Aerofoto - DUTH

 

An 2 - Interspect

 

BNI - MUMM

 

C 182J - UM SEAES

 

C 208 - Enviscope

 

CITATION - NLR

 

Cessna182 - Interspect

 

DA42MPP - DAS

 

DIMO - METAIR

 

DO128 - TUBs

 

ENDURO - UFZ

 

ERA - INES LU

 

ERA SkyArrow - IBIMET

 

Egrett - ARA

 

G550 HALO - DLR

 
 

COMET - COMET

From Monday 27th February 2017 to Friday 19th May 2017

Description

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Not open to training Not open to training
Not open to training Not open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 27th February 2017 (week 09) to Friday 19th May 2017 (week 20)

Aircraft name Aircraft: G550 HALO - DLR

Location Location: Map EDMO, Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

 

EMeRGe-EU - EMeRGe-EU

From Monday 22nd May 2017 to Friday 4th August 2017

Description

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Not open to training Not open to training
Not open to training Not open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 22nd May 2017 (week 21) to Friday 4th August 2017 (week 31)

Aircraft name Aircraft: G550 HALO - DLR

Location Location: Map EDMO, Oberofaffenhofen, Germany

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

 

WISE - Wave-driven ISentropic Exchange

From Monday 7th August 2017 to Friday 27th October 2017

Description

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Not open to training Not open to training
Not open to training Not open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 7th August 2017 (week 32) to Friday 27th October 2017 (week 43)

Aircraft name Aircraft: G550 HALO - DLR

Location Location: Map EINN, Shannon, Ireland

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

 

IL 18D - CAO

 

IronEye - UNIFI

 

King-Air - INCAS

 

King-Air - TAU

 

M55 - Geophysica

 

METRO II - NLR

 

PA-32 Cherokee Six - Interspect

 

PZL 101 Gawron - Interspect

 

Seneca - IBIMET

 

Seneca - OGS

 

TU-154 FACT - GFRI

 

Zeppelin LZ N07-100

Planning at Thursday 23rd November 2017 (Week 47).