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Planning at Friday 28th April 2017 (Week 17).
 

BAe146 - FAAM

 

STANCO - School and Training on Aircraft New and well-established techniques for Atmospheric Composition Observation.

From Monday 26th June 2017 to Thursday 6th July 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: TA-015. Applications of atmospheric in-situ measurements.

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : DI CARLO Piero

Project confirmed Project confirmed
Transnational Access project Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 26th June 2017 (week 26) to Thursday 6th July 2017 (week 27)

Aircraft name Aircraft: BAe146 - FAAM

Season Season: 14 days during summer 2017.

Location Location:

The STANCO school will be held at the University of Cambridge, UK. Nearby suitable airport is the Cranfield airport, where the BAe-146 is based. In this way we will reduce the costs of transit for the aircraft, costs for accommodation and living of pilots, AVALON technicians and so on. Moreover, since at the University of Cambridge there are several researchers involved in aircraft observations, we can get some of them involved in the Training course to serve as Lecturers. Alternatively it will be held after a scientific campaign planned for summer 2017 in the airport where the campaign will based.

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract Training and education in airborne measurements of the atmospheric trace gases with special focus on new and emerging techniques, issues in the instruments calibration and links to modelling, dynamics and transport of atmospheric compounds.

Measurements to be made by aircraft The main objective is to provide, for students on a PhD level and postdoctoral early carrier scientists, an overview about measurement techniques, data analysis and specifics of the airborne measurements of species relevant in the atmospheric chemistry. Emphasis will be on new instruments and emerging observational techniques for aircraft observations. The lectures will include an introduction on atmospheric composition focusing on pollution transport, vertical distribution of atmospheric compounds and links between air pollution and climate changes. Air pollution and climate changes are global problems and the species responsible of these environmental issues are emitted essentially by the same processes: fossil fuel burning. Observations of these compounds on aircraft platforms is worthwhile because usually most of them have a high dependence with the altitude and a big horizontal variability. Moreover aircrafts allow in-situ measurements that help to identify and track emission plume of atmospheric trace gases. The lectures will cover the technical, engineering and safety aspects of the airborne measurements, not specific issue of one particular aircraft but the general aspects related to the most aircraft platforms used for atmospheric studies. Other lectures will focus on general aspects of the atmospheric composition, trace gases transport and chemistry. The STANCO course is planned to take place in Cambridge and Cranfield (UK) in summer 2017 for approximately 10 days and will be held at the University of Cambridge (UK). The lectures will be accompanied by a short visit of the FAAM BAe 146 research airplane (2 – 3 days). Students accepted for school will be asked, prior the STANCO School, to submit a small proposal of measurements that could be taken with the scientific payload available on board the aircraft. Depending on weather conditions, FAAM airplane will try to follow the students’ plans during ferry and mission flight. Data produced in the ferry and mission flight during the course of the STANCO will provide the basis for student’s final report from the course. The core teachers will be specialists in development of chemistry instruments and on their use on aircraft campaigns. Further lectures will be carried out by one FAAM aircraft systems manager, expert on instrument installations and certifications and by two lecturers specialist on atmospheric chemistry models. The possible preliminary list of invited teachers could be: Phil Brown (Met Office, UK), Jim McQuaid (University of Leeds, UK), Stephane Bauguitte (FAAM, UK), Carl Percival (University of Manchester, UK), Alan Woolley or Stephen Devereau or Mo Smith (FAAM, UK), Radovan Krejci (Stockholm University, Sweden), Rod Jones (University of Cambridge, UK), Alex Archibald (University of Cambridge, UK), Piero Di Carlo (L’Aquila University, Italy). The duration of the STANCO school is planned for not more than 10 days. This will include lectures (2 per days) for the first 5 days. The remaining time will include visit of the BAe-146 aircraft at the Cranfield airport and at the FAAM building, preparation of the flights and data analysis. The lectures will include following subjects: 1) Introduction to the atmospheric composition (chemistry and aerosol). 2) Atmospheric transport (large-scale transport, convection, turbulent entrainment). 3) Airborne measurements, pros and cons 4) New observational system for the atmospheric composition: already installed on aircraft and techniques not yet integrated on-board aircrafts. 5) O3, NOx, NOy, CO, CO2, CH4, HCN in-situ measurement techniques, which are the main species measured during research campaigns. Furthermore these species are measured using commercial instruments, so their data are immediately ready to be used for analysis during the school. 6) Custom instruments for in-situ measurements using techniques like CIMS, LIF, CARS, those systems provide real-time data that are available after each flight, so students can analyse them immediately. 7) Design and requirements for the scientific payload on board of the aircraft 8) Logistical, operational, flight planning aspects of the STANCO flights. 9) How airborne chemistry data can be used and what we can learn from them (scientific aspects). 10) Computer exercises, including data analysis and chemistry models exercises.

Weather constraints Weather conditions: Both, clear sky and cloudy conditions are fine to explore different aspect of atmospheric chemistry

Time constraints Time constraints: Availability of suitable air space. Availability of the BAe-146 aircraft with suitable instrumentation kit on board.

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): With respect to available number of hours for BAe-146 during 2017 within EUFAR-TA, three to four short flights of 4 hours are planned (depends on the students number).

Instruments Instruments: None

 

FA20 - DLR

 

FA20 - SAFIRE

 

Rasta ESA - Rasta ESA

From Monday 2nd January 2017 to Tuesday 31st January 2017

Description

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : None

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Not open to training Not open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 2nd January 2017 (week 01) to Tuesday 31st January 2017 (week 05)

Aircraft name Aircraft: FA20 - SAFIRE

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Instruments Instruments: None

 

AEROCLO-SA - AEROCLO-SA

From Tuesday 1st August 2017 to Saturday 30th September 2017

Description

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : Paola Formenti

Project confirmed Project confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Not open to training Not open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Tuesday 1st August 2017 (week 31) to Saturday 30th September 2017 (week 39)

Aircraft name Aircraft: FA20 - SAFIRE

Location Location: Map Walvis Bay Namibia

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Instruments Instruments: None

 

Learjet - Enviscope

 

Zeppelin LZ N07-100

 

ATR42 - SAFIRE

 

EASI - Exploring Air Sea Interaction via airborne data – a training course

From Sunday 25th June 2017 to Tuesday 4th July 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: TA-017. Proposals for training courses in hyperspectral imaging applications or in-situ sampling

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : LANOTTE Alessandra Sabina

Project confirmed Project confirmed
Transnational Access project Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Sunday 25th June 2017 (week 25) to Tuesday 4th July 2017 (week 27)

Aircraft name Aircraft: ATR42 - SAFIRE

Season Season: From June 25, to July 4, 2017 . The prelimanary programme is available here: http://eufar.net/documents/6143

Location Location:

The location of the Training Course is Shannon, with the aircraft based at Shannon Airport. A position close to the airport will be chosen to maximize the training course outcome and contain transporting expenses. Location of the school provides, beyond lodging, classroom and teaching facilities too. A collaboration with the airport authorities that might provide useful ancillary services, as real time weather radar images would be profitable: efforts will be promoted in this direction. Shannon airport has been selected for the three following reasons: 1) the airport is close to the coast, and hence its position is ideal for the specific scientific purpose of the school, wich is to collect measurements on air-sea interaction and near-coastal boundary layer structure and dynamics; 2) Shannon airport is not new to this kind of experience, a noticeable example is the NASA project studying the chemistry of aircraft emissions in the trans-Atlantic flight corridor (SONEX: https://cloud1.arc.nasa.gov/sonex/); 3) Shannon is the closest available airport to Mace Head station, with which we established an agreement for a synergic use of data during the timeframe of the EUFAR school. The agreement relies also on the existence of a joint lab established in 2015 between the italian CNR-ISAC (the institution of the present proposal PI) and the Center for Climate & Air Pollution Studies, National University of Ireland. We already contacted Shannon Airport authorities and received their positive feedback about the proposal. Moreover, to find the best solution for the venue, we contacted Karen Brosnahan, who is the General Manager of the Shannon Region Conference and Sports Bureau.

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract The primary goal of the EASI proposed course is to teach and train students (PhD and Post-graduate) and young scientists on the use of a research aircraft, and on the experimental possibilities it opens for atmospheric physics and chemistry research. This implies providing them with a complete overview of the airborne and remote sensing experimental techniques, and on specific features of collection and analysis of airborne measurements. In addition, EASI aims at trasferring to participants consolidated knowledge, and recent advancements in relation to the specific topics of air-sea interaction, and near coastal boundary layer structure and dynamics. It is planned to host about 20 students that will be selected on the basis of their CV, and of a short scientific proposal about possible measurements and related research questions. The EUFAR Training school, once approved, will be advertised through its standard means, and an call will be opened to select participants. There are no specific prerequisites for the course, but having a background in atmospheric and ocean sciences, geophysics, and/or meteorology will be positively considered. Trainees have to design a flight plan and participate to a flight experiment. The data gathered are then processed and analysed with the support of tutors, who are experienced users of airborne facilities. EASI training course is planned to take place either from June 25, to July 4, 2017 close to Shannon Airport , Ireland (53°N,9°W). To fully exploit the possibilities opened by a instrumented aircraft at disposal, we established an agreement with Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station (http://www.macehead.org/), to organise a synergic use of the data collected both from the aircraft and from the ground station, during the school time frame. Specifically, flight experiments and lectures of EASI will deal with the problem of air-sea interaction, focusing on turbulence fluctuations in the near coastal boundary layer, clouds micro-physics, atmospheric composition and its impacts on climate, momentum and heat exchanges at the air/sea interface. Lectures will be alternated with working groups on instrument calibration, safety issues and data analysis. The PI of this proposal has led the EUFAR training course TETRAD in 2010. A preliminary list of invited lecturers is the following (not yet complete): Francesco Cairo, CNR ISAC Rome (Italy) - confirmed & member of EUFAR Maria Cristina Facchini, CNR ISAC Bologna (Italy) - confirmed Ian C. Faloona, University of California (USA) - confirmed & member of EUFAR Szymon Malinowski, Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland) - confirmed & member of EUFAR Mario Miglietta, CNR ISAC Padova (Italy) - confirmed

Measurements to be made by aircraft The scientific objectives of this proposal can be summarised as follows: 1. The primary goal of the EASI course is to train participant on how to use an aircraft as a research tool and how to manage an experiment with airborne measurements. 2. The secondary goal of the school lectures and of the related experiments is to train and educate students about the air-sea interaction process and their influence on the near coastal boundary layer structure and dynamics. The training school experiments are conceived for education purpose and not for research. Hence, they do not aim at dealing with all physical and chemical factors relevant for this complex environment. Rather, they will focus on specific topics, such as the effects of coastal process on momentum and heat exchanges, and mixing; the near-coastal boundary layer structure and dynamics; marine aerosols and clouds formation at near coastal sites. Many of these topics can be discussed in relation to the available instrumentation of the SAFIRE ATR42 aircraft. From the available climatology for the region of Shannon, we expect to have mild weather condition , with mean daily temperatures in the range [10:20] °C, partly cloudy or cloudy sky, and relative humidity about 80%. These conditions are perfectly suitable for the purpose of the training school, dealing with measurements within the near-coastal boundary layer, and measurements at the base or inside marine clouds. As mentioned, the chosen application field is Air-Sea interaction and near-coastal boundary layer, for which in-situ observations represent a unique possibility to access to a wide range of highly resolved data. EASI school lectures, given by experts of airborne measurements and atmospheric physics and chemistry, will cover the following topics divided into three main themes: 1) Fundamentals on Airborne measurements - Introduction to the set of instruments on the aircraft - Aircraft operation limitations, flight plans and safety issues - Basic measurement techniques - Measurement issues unique to aircraft platform interaction with the environment - Data processing and interpretation issues 2) Near-coastal boundary layer (BL) and air-sea interaction - momentum & heat exchanges - mixing - mean and fluctuating components - BL structure & dynamics, and the role of the ocean 3) Atmospheric composition and the impact on climate - Marine aerosol micro-physics - Marine aerosol and cloud droplets concentration and size distribution - Impact on climate Summarising, the specific objectives of this proposal will be achieved by organising an intense and well structured training by means of: • Lectures on specific topics by experienced researchers • Lectures on airborne measurements and their limitations by expert of the fields • Training on the security issue for airborne measurements by SAFIRE staff • Individual/Group work to build up the flight plans and identify the scientific questions of the airborne experiment • Practical group work to discuss and analyse data: resolution issues, data interpretation. We will foster active learning by inviting student to handle specific scientific questions, and discuss them within the training group. It is expected that, at the end of the school, students have received: i) a first training of research aircraft, and airborne-based experimental techniques and research possibilities; ii) an overview of the scientific problems - related to air-sea interaction and near-coastal boundary layer structures and dynamics-, that can be tackled via in-situ measurements.

Weather constraints Weather conditions: Clear and partly cloudy weather. Cloudy boundary layer.

Time constraints Time constraints: The Training school is expected to last 10 to 12 days. Even if the baseline award for any Transnational Access proposal is 10 hours, we ask EUFAR to award 12-14 hours flight to this project. The reason of this request is the estimated transit flight time Toulouse-Shannon-Toulouse, of about 6:30h. SAFIRE agrees not to charge EUFAR for one transit flight. Having 12-14 hours granted would allow us to make four training flights of at least 1.5h each, and not having extremely rigid constraints on flight duration. Beyond this request, we do not have other time constraints, exception made for the airport authorization.

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): It is planned to make four flights, hosting five students each. Flight duration - which might vary depending on weather conditions-, is about 1,5 hours each. At the present stage, it is planned to negotiate flight paths for three days of flying, to be established. These can be useful to best exploit local weather conditions. Detailed flight paths will be designed during the training course, however some working airspace will be negotiated in advance, with airport authorities. Definition of the flight patterns will be done in the initial stages of the school, and will be an essential part of the training activities of the course. Generally, flight patterns are designed to best characterizing the physical properties of interest. In the present case, since we are interested in near-coastal boundary layer and air-sea interaction, we will fly in proximity of Mace Head facility. Aerosol-cloud interaction in the north Atlantic Marine Boundary Layer could also be studied, if we can exploit ground aerosol measurements at Mace Head, combined to aircraft measurements obtained from quasi-lagrangian flight legs.

Instruments Instruments: Airborne Aerosol Reference Pod - Microphysics

 

POLAR 5 - AWI

 

ANT 2016/17 - Airborne geophysical surveys and remote sensing

From Monday 7th November 2016 to Saturday 25th February 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: Several projects for mapping ice thickness, magnetic and gravity field, altimetry, and photography

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : None

Project confirmed Project confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 7th November 2016 (week 45) to Saturday 25th February 2017 (week 08)

Aircraft name Aircraft: POLAR 5 - AWI

Location Location:

Novo runway, Neumayer station, Kohnen Station, field camps, all Antarctica

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Measurements to be made by aircraft - ice penetrating radar - magnetics - gravity - laser scanning - photography

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): 20-30 flights, max. 160 h

Instruments Instruments: None

 
 

PAMARCMIP 2017 - PAMARCMIP

From Monday 13th March 2017 to Tuesday 18th April 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: Polar Airborne Measurements and Regional Climate Model Simulation Project) as contribution of NETwork on Climate and Aerosols: Addressing Key Uncertainties in Remote Canadian Environments

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : None

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 13th March 2017 (week 11) to Tuesday 18th April 2017 (week 16)

Aircraft name Aircraft: POLAR 5 - AWI

Location Location: Map various Canada, Greenland, Svalbard

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract The operation with the AWI POLAR aircraft represents one key component of the atmospheric and sea ice study in the Arctic within the PAMARCMIP program (Polar Airborne Measurements and Regional Climate Model Simulation Project). Within PAMARCMIP large-scale measurement of sea ice thickness in key Arctic areas will be performed in the framework of an international cooperation between German, Canadian and US institutes. The plan for spring 2017 is similar to the successful PAMARCMiP campaigns since 2009. Sea ice thickness is the key property for predicting the summer minimum sea ice extent. Sea ice thinning and retreat are expected to continue as a result of climate change with a major uncertainty introduced by decadal and long-term natural climate variability. Accurate ice thickness information is still sparse over the Arctic Ocean. Additionally snow thickness measurements are planned with a radar system. Further, atmospheric components will be measured simultaneously to the Sea ice and snow thickness measurements, amongst which are aerosols, black carbon and different trace gases. These measurements have been performed since 2009 with the aim to fill the knowledge gaps in the spatial and temporal distribution and variability. The research focus for the aircraft activity is the area from Svalbard to Alaska. As described below, the flight campaigns will contribute to our understanding of the role, the sources, and the transport pathways of atmospheric aerosol - especially black carbon - in the Arctic. The study will include the identification of local sources of observed aerosol layers.

Science context Polar regions, troposphere Aerosol chemistry and physics, Geophysics and Glaciology, Pollution (includes air, sea and soil)

Measurements to be made by aircraft - sea-ice thickness - altimetry - basic meteorological parameters - aerosol distribution

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): 20-25 flights, max. 130 h

Instruments Instruments: None

 

ACLOUD 2017 - Arctic Amplification: Fluxes in the Cloudy Atmospheric Boundary Layer

From Wednesday 17th May 2017 to Saturday 8th July 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: Measurements of turbulent and radiative energy fluxes above, in and below Arctic boundary layer clouds for differentmeteorological, sea ice and aerosol conditions

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : None

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Wednesday 17th May 2017 (week 20) to Saturday 8th July 2017 (week 27)

Aircraft name Aircraft: POLAR 5 - AWI

Location Location: Map Longyearbyen, Svalbard

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract The main objectives of this project are (i) to measure energy fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over polar sea ice in cloudy and clear-sky conditions, (ii) to investigate their dependence on aerosol particle properties and vertical distribution, and (iii) to compare the energy fluxes with respective model results. The analysis of the data of this project will help to understand the role of low- level Arctic clouds in the energy budget of the ABL. The program is closely linked with the planned DFG SFB/Transregio project on Arctic amplification (acronym (AC)3, Arctic Amplification: Climate Relevant Atmospheric and Surface Processes, and Feedback, pre-proposal submitted to DFG in June 2014). The instrumented Polar 5 and Polar 6 aircraft will be used to perform the measurements of turbulent and radiation fluxes as a function of cloud cover, sea ice characteristics, synoptic forcing, and geographic position with a focus on the vertical distribution of the fluxes. Both aircraft will be equipped with remote sensing (Polar 5) and in-situ (mainly on Polar 6) instrumentation. Measurements based on the combination of turbulence and radiation, as well as microphysical probes, Lidar, Radar and microwave sensors for aerosol and cloud properties will improve our understanding of the interaction between cloud characteristics and turbulence and of their role for the ABL energy budget. The campaign will be closely coordinated with a proposed cruise of RV Polarstern (PASCAL, Physical feedbacks of Arctic PBL, Sea ice, Cloud And Aerosol) that will be used as a platform for surface based observations using a large suite of meteorological instrumentation (installed partly on the ship and on sea ice) to determine e.g., the surface energy budget. Due to the close link to (AC)3 and PASCAL several groups from different German research institutes (Universities of Bremen, Köln, and Leipzig, TROPOS Leipzig, AWI Bremerhaven and AWI Potsdam) will benefit from the measurement program although not all of them will directly participate in the measurements.

Science context Atmospheric boundary layer, polar regions Cloud physics, Ocean-Atmosphere interactions, Radiation

Measurements to be made by aircraft  Airborne observations of meteorological and sea ice parameters supplementing shipborne observations of the atmospheric profile and surface energy budget by RV Polarstern during the research cruise PASCAL;  Measurements characterizing the mean state of the atmospheric boundary layer during late spring/early summer (temperature, humidity, wind components);  Turbulent fluxes (vertical profiles based on horizontal, vertically staggered flight sections);  Aerosol number and mass size distributions;  Cloud particle shape, concentration, size distribution, scattering phase function;  Aerosol and meteorological profiles up to 3 km altitude;  Spectral upward and downward radiances and broadband irradiances;  Polarized upward radiance and imagery;  Retrieval of cloud optical thickness and effective radius maps based on hyperspectral imaging;

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): 15-25 flights, max. 160 h

Instruments Instruments: None

 

TIFAX 2017 - Thick Ice Feeding Arctic Export

From Saturday 15th July 2017 to Tuesday 15th August 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: Sea ice thickness determination across Fram Strait and north of Greenland.

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : None

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Saturday 15th July 2017 (week 28) to Tuesday 15th August 2017 (week 33)

Aircraft name Aircraft: POLAR 5 - AWI

Location Location: Map Station Nord, Greenland

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract Fram Strait is the main gateway for sea ice export out of the Arctic Ocean, and therefore observations there give insight into composition and properties of Arctic sea ice in general and how it varies over time. An extensive data set of ground-based and airborne electromagnetic ice thickness measurements were collected between 2001 and 2015 during severall aircraft (PAMARCMIP, TIFAX) and Polarstern campaigns. The first aim of the proposed aircraft campaign is to complement earlier sea ice thickness measurements made north of Svalbard and over Fram Strait. A second objective is to extent previous measurements to the Lincoln Sea. Data will be used to together with satellite based information on sea ice motion, to number sea ice outflow through Fram Strait in summer and investigate thinning of sea ice due to reduction of old multi-year ice. In addition to sea ice surveys, atmospheric components will be measured.

Science context Marine science, Ocean-Atmosphere interaction

Measurements to be made by aircraft - sea ice thickness - altimetry - optical imagery

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): 4-10 flights, max 60 h

Instruments Instruments: None

 
 

ANT 2017/18 - Airborne geophysical surveys and remote sensing as well as logistic support of field teams and stations

From Monday 6th November 2017 to Saturday 24th February 2018

Description

Project theme Project theme: Several projects for mapping ice thickness, magnetic and gravity field, altimetry, and photography

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : None

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 6th November 2017 (week 45) to Saturday 24th February 2018 (week 08)

Aircraft name Aircraft: POLAR 5 - AWI

Location Location:

Novo runway, Neumayer station, Kohnen Station, field camps, all Antarctica

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Science context Polar Regions, geophysics and glaciology

Measurements to be made by aircraft - ice penetrating radar - magnetics - gravity - laser scanning - photography

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): 20-30 flights, max 160 h

Instruments Instruments: None

 

C 208 - DLR

 

CASA 212 AR - INTA

 

CASA 212 RS - INTA

 

DO228 - NERC - ARSF

 

DO228/D-CFFU - DLR

 

DO228/D-CODE - DLR

 

STEMME S15 - INTA

 

Twin Otter - NERC - BAS

 

C 207 - FUB

 

ECO Dimona - UEDIN

 

ENDURO - KIT

 

ERAs - CNR ISAFom

 

PIPER AZTEC - SAFIRE

 

Partenavia - Enviscope

 

TASI Partenavia IMAA

 

RS4forestEBV-A - Airborne remote sensing for monitoring essential biodiversity variables in forest ecosystems-A

From Monday 3rd July 2017 to Friday 14th July 2017

Description

Project theme Project theme: TA-013. Proposals for training courses in hyperspectral imaging applications or in-situ sampling

Scientific contact Scientific contact (PI) : SKIDMORE Andrew

Project confirmed Project confirmed
Transnational Access project Transnational Access project
Open to training Open to training
Open to training Open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 3rd July 2017 (week 27) to Friday 14th July 2017 (week 28)

Aircraft name Aircraft: TASI Partenavia IMAA

Season Season: July 2017- Parallel to ICARE conference.

Location Location:

The area chosen for this study is the Bavarian Forest National Park which is more heterogeneous in tree species than similar areas in the region. It is located in south-eastern Germany along the border with the Czech Republic (490 3’ 19” N, 130 12’ 9” E). The park has a total area of 24,218 hectares. The study site is included in several European research projects and hands on data are available for the training course with the support of the “Data pool initiative for the Bohemian Forest Ecosystem”. Temporal airborne hyperspectral, LIDAR and aerial photography as well as high spatial resolution satellite images such as Rapid Eye, SPOT-5 and Sentinel2 acquired during the growing season of 2015 and 2016 in support of the RS4EBV project are available together with field measurements of plant traits for consecutive years.

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

Abstract Forest management requires the use of comprehensive remote sensing data which enable monitoring biodiversity changes in response to calamities such as bark beetle infestation and other climate change induced phenomena. They also enable to predict the long-term impact of management decisions. Although the benefits of remote sensing for monitoring vegetation are well recognized, yet accurate and site specific monitoring of many essential biodiversity variables in forest ecosystems remain elusive. In this training course, the special skills required for processing the new generation of airborne and satellite hyperspectral, thermal and LIDAR data for retrieving essential biodiversity variables in forest ecosystems will be presented. In forests, bidirectional effects mainly influence hyperspectral airborne signals and directly affect the accuracy of derived variables. Simultaneous acquisition of thermal, VIS/NIR hyperspectral and LIDAR data (See RS4forestEBV-B) allow accurate retrieval of vegetation parameters (e.g., LAI, chlorophyll, SLA, nitrogen, water content, species occurrence and 3D vegetation structural attributes) which have been recognized as essential biodiversity variables by GEO-BON and are crucial in forestry and national park management practices. Several ongoing projects will support this training course including the ESA Innovator III project (RS4EBV). The participants will be trained in remote sensing algorithms and retrieval of essential biodiversity variables. The BIOKLIM project which is coordinated by Bavarian Forest National Park (BFNP), will provide data and expert knowledge on forest structure, biodiversity and management issues as well as facilitate access to the field sites, flux towers and field data collection techniques.

Measurements to be made by aircraft Biophysical and biochemical vegetation parameters can characterize changes in biodiversity through changes in ecosystem structure and function. Although remote sensing, especially high spatial resolution hyperspectral imagery can be used to measure many biophysical and biochemical variables, retrieval of these parameters across different remote sensing systems to understand their dynamics remains an open challenge and the uncertainty sources and multiple approaches has to be taken in account. Commonly these data are used as stand-alone sources for retrieving the vegetation traits. However, the challenge is that in the presence of different data sources, which sources or combination of sources are most suitable for retrieving a specific variables and how these data sources can be used complementary. Therefore, two parallel proposals (RS4foestEBV- A and B) are suggested to address the aim of this training course which is to demonstrate how different remote sensing data and in-situ measurements of plant traits 1) can be used to model vegetation and 2) be linked to image data inversion in order to retrieve plant variables and map their spatial patterns. Accordingly, in this course the skills required for processing the new generation of airborne hyperspectral, thermal hyperspectral and LIDAR data for retrieving forest essential biodiversity traits will be presented. The course will highlight the added value of airborne data for forest management and biodiversity monitoring. Of special relevance is the envisaged test site (Bavarian Forest National Park) which encompasses a wide range of heterogeneous spatial patterns of temperate vegetation, where disturbances such as bark beetle calamities and storm damage substantially alter the structure of coniferous and mixed stands and cause changes to biodiversity. The simultaneous acquisitions of high spatial resolution airborne hyperspectral (See RS4forestEBV-B), thermal hyperspectral and LIDAR data allow us to better understand and monitor vegetation parameters. Furthermore, the ground data collection aims to provide the course participants with knowhow on tools (field spectroscopy, thermal spectrometry and terrestrial LIDAR) and measurement techniques to collect different vegetation variables. The training course enables the participants to achieve the following learning objectives: • To map different vegetation parameters using hyperspectral visible/NIR /thermal and LIDAR data ; • To understand the advantage of each data sources and the best combinations of them for retrieving vegetation parameters;. • To understand data processing chains; • To understand the challenge of collecting and integrating forest field data with remote sensing imagery; The training course will be structured as 4 stand-alone but interlinked working groups as described in the attachment. Although each working group will be piloted independently in the training course, they are all scientifically related and each forms an important component of the training course project. The overall themes of the working groups and their lead are as follows: • Working Group 1- Hyperspectral: to map the species occurrence, biophysical, biochemical properties and plant traits of the study area with high spectral resolution imagery by empirical and radiative transfer models; Lead by Roshanak Darvishzadeh; • Working Group 2- Thermal hyperspectral: to map the species occurrence, biophysical and biochemical properties of the study area with hyperspectral thermal imagery; Lead by Martin Schlerf; • Working Group 3- Atmospheric correction: to provide airborne reflectance comparable with proximal sensing including BRDF estimations and validation; Lead by Tiejun Wang • Working Group 4- LIDAR: to map the spatial patterns of heterogeneity and structural characteristics of the forest with laser scanner data; Lead by Marco Huerich All course participants (Working Groups) will be familiarized with the design of the flight and will be involved in sampling design and field measurements of the plant traits which will be used for analysis of the acquired images. They will all have the opportunity to learn tools and techniques used during vegetation field data collection. The University of Twente, Faculty of ITC, will be the coordinator and train participants in remote sensing algorithms for retrieval of essential biodiversity variables directly from acquired images. ITC has conducted several field measurements in BFNP and collected vegetation traits for the last three years. The BFNP as the key user has already established 330 sampling plots along four main straight transects covering the altitudinal and structural gradients. All environmental variables are derived from field measurements, aerial photographs, LIDAR data and climate stations. In 2016, the field measurements will be repeated in about half of these sample plots (i.e., 157) jointly with a LIDAR flight campaign covering gradients of altitude and forest structure. Moreover aerial photography is taking place every year in the park and the historical data are available. These huge source of existing data are an advantage for the training course, since the hands on data will be already accessible for the participants and can be used as reference dataset. Apart from participants of the training course, the collected data will be used by several PhD students who are studying the retrieval of different vegetation variables in the using different data sources at filed and airborne level. As there is an urgency to better characterize and understand forest ecosystem status in a time of rapid climate and landscape change, this training course offers EUFAR an opportunity to demonstrate innovative airborne science as well as having a valuable training component for PhD students and young carrier researchers.

Weather constraints Weather conditions: The proposed activities require clear sky conditions (very low cloudiness and haze for hyperspectral sensors). Some (cumulus) clouds (up to 1/8) can be accepted.

Time constraints Time constraints: The time schedule for the overflight requested in the present training course is the month of July in summer 2017 concurrent to ICARE conference which is hosted by DLR. Therefore, the ferry to the survey area will be minimized, since it is foreseen, that all aircraft will be all located at DLR during ICARE. Coincident times with the overpasses of Sentinel 2 are also desirable. The time of the flight should be as close as possible to local solar noon (i.e. from 10 AM to 2 PM local time for data acquisition) so as to minimize the effect of the anisotropy of the surface on reflectance measurements and under light winds to ensure stable flying conditions.

Flights (number and patterns) Flights (number and patterns): We propose one flight in July 2017 for approximately 10 hours with respect to the distance of the base APT.

Instruments Instruments: None

Other constraints Other constraints or requirements: none

 

ASK16 - FUB

 

Aerofoto - DUTH

 

An 2 - Interspect

 

BNI - MUMM

 

C 182J - UM SEAES

 

C 208 - Enviscope

 

CITATION - NLR

 

Cessna182 - Interspect

 

DA42MPP - DAS

 

DIMO - METAIR

 

DO128 - TUBs

 

ENDURO - UFZ

 

ERA - INES LU

 

ERA SkyArrow - IBIMET

 

Egrett - ARA

 

G550 HALO - DLR

 
 

COMET - COMET

From Monday 27th February 2017 to Friday 19th May 2017

Description

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Not open to training Not open to training
Not open to training Not open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 27th February 2017 (week 09) to Friday 19th May 2017 (week 20)

Aircraft name Aircraft: G550 HALO - DLR

Location Location: Map EDMO, Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

 

EMeRGe-EU - EMeRGe-EU

From Monday 22nd May 2017 to Friday 4th August 2017

Description

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Not open to training Not open to training
Not open to training Not open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 22nd May 2017 (week 21) to Friday 4th August 2017 (week 31)

Aircraft name Aircraft: G550 HALO - DLR

Location Location: Map EDMO, Oberofaffenhofen, Germany

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

 

WISE - Wave-driven ISentropic Exchange

From Monday 7th August 2017 to Friday 27th October 2017

Description

Project not confirmed Project not confirmed
Not Transnational Access project Not Transnational Access project
Not open to training Not open to training
Not open to training Not open to sharing

Planning and location

Starting date From Monday 7th August 2017 (week 32) to Friday 27th October 2017 (week 43)

Aircraft name Aircraft: G550 HALO - DLR

Location Location: Map EINN, Shannon, Ireland

Description of the experiment

Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output Scientific objectives / Proposed work / Anticipated output

 

IL 18D - CAO

 

IronEye - UNIFI

 

King-Air - INCAS

 

King-Air - TAU

 

M55 - Geophysica

 

METRO II - NLR

 

PA-32 Cherokee Six - Interspect

 

PZL 101 Gawron - Interspect

 

Seneca - IBIMET

 

Seneca - OGS

 

TU-154 FACT - GFRI

Planning at Friday 28th April 2017 (Week 17).